videopodcastblogessayinterviewnewspublicationpeopleAPRIAonline courses
Marc Quinn, Breath, 2012/2013, Venice. (Stills from video)

Vulnerable Looking

essay
dossier: Body and power(lessness)
Kijk voor de Nederlandse vertaling hieronder.

Jules Sturm writes in this essay about the vulnerable body in art. She tries to find answers to the question of how art, disability and vulnerability can relate to each other in a constructive way. How can 'disability' change not only the way we feel, but also the way we look at others, at ourselves and at the art we make? What can 'vulnerability' mean for the artist as a tool?

The essay, in its original English text, will be part of the online publication Powertools, a publication of ArtEZ studium generale that will be published in the spring of 2022 on the relationship between art and socio-political issues of power, inclusion and exclusion. The essays are all written with the intention of making accessible theoretical concepts relevant to diversity and inclusion: concepts that artists can use as a tool for design, construction or creation or by teachers in higher arts education.


An art object is a body that makes other bodies feel. 1

The appearance of disability is chaotic, beautiful, enigmatic—a force that changes the history of art and our perception of the world. Disability is an aesthetic value in itself.
2

When critical disability theorist Tobin Siebers calls disability ‘the aesthetic object that makes modern art possible,’3 he makes us rethink whatever notions we might have about art and disability. On the basis of two art works by British artist Marc Quinn, I will make an attempt at such rethinking with a specific goal: to introduce the concept of vulnerability as a tool to re-engage (or practise differently) our ways of looking at human embodiment.
The aim of this essay is to find partial and multiple answers to these questions: How do art, disability and vulnerability productively relate? How can ‘disability’ change not only the way we feel but also the way we look at others, ourselves, and the art we produce? And, finally, how can the concept of vulnerability—in addition to the individual experience and the universal human condition of vulnerability—become a tool for practising artists?

Marc Quinn’s famous sculptures (see images 1 and 2) of Alison Lapper, who is a visual artist with a severe limb disability, are monumental, sleek, and aesthetically pleasing to look at, yet they are also challenging for the nudity, the advanced pregnancy, and the almost condescending look they exhibit. The sculptures dispute social agreements about what type of art is tolerable to be shown publicly. Yet, Quinn’s work was accepted as ‘public art,’ which is unusual for art inspired by disability. Such acceptance is a useful occasion to look more closely at the (disruptive) effects of these artworks on their viewers and to explore their creative potential. What then can we learn from analysing Quinn’s controversial art? And what do we gain from engaging in what I call ‘disability aesthetics’?4

In an interview, Siebers explains: ‘[The] more artwork incorporates disability, the greater the chance […] to change the body politic.’5 Clearly, the aim of engaging in disability aesthetics is to transform societies, which have dismissed disabled embodiment and cognition as nothing but an aberration of nature. My analysis, therefore, aims to reveal how we can productively participate in aesthetic practices that challenge the belief in embodied difference as deviance and instead treat it as variation of human nature.

My premise is that to participate in such an endeavour is never a simple question of an art work’s success or failure, but includes a careful, slow, and sometimes frustrating engagement in the re-thinking and un-learning of all the practices, material engagements, senses, and actors involved in the process of producing an art work. I hereby hope to contribute to expanding the tools for art making and visual thinking towards a more inclusive and diverse aesthetics. I will here use two of Marc Quinn’s sculptures of Alison Lapper, Alison Lapper Pregnant (image 1) and Breath (image 2), as examples of disability art, which help me reveal how such practices can be developed.


Relational Vulnerability

Let me introduce the first sculpture: ‘[…] Alison Lapper Pregnant [is a] marble sculpture more than three metres tall, [portraying] the artist Alison Lapper, showing her nude and eight-months pregnant. It was on display in London for eighteen months (September 2005–April 2007) on Trafalgar Square’s fourth Plinth. Quinn’s sculpture, positioned in London’s crowded centre alongside equestrian statues of such heroes of the British Empire as Lord Nelson, shows a self-confident, almost warrior-like woman, who suffers from phocomelia, a congenital condition that caused her to be born with shortened legs and without arms or hands. Cast as a statue in sleek white Italian marble, Lapper is depicted as a mother-to-be with a disabled body. The work caused some controversy: the statue was said to be powerful and inspiring as well as ugly and repellent. It elicits shamed yet fascinated reactions to the pregnant woman’s nakedness along with feelings of empowerment for people with disabilities. Alison Lapper’s own art aims to put disability, femininity, and motherhood on the map of public recognition. But does this representation of her as a disabled maternal subject manage to destabilise conventional aesthetic ideals and challenge ways of looking at disabled bodies in public?’ 6

I believe that Quinn’s marble sculpture does not invite its viewers to engage in a corporeal relation with what it represents: a disabled pregnant mother-to be; an-other body. If we define corporeality as our own sense of embodiment in the world and as our sensory and affective encounters with other bodies, corporeality reveals that ‘the body is less an entity [or object], than a relation,’ in which it comes to exist only on the basis of its connections to other bodies and the support of environmental and infrastructural conditions of living.7

In this sense, corporeality is ‘intercorporeality,’ which emphasises that ‘the experience of being embodied is never a private affair, but is always already mediated by our continual interactions with other human and nonhuman bodies.’8 The sculpture unquestionably challenges conventional views of disabled bodies and motherhood and claims public recognition of so-called disruptive bodies. Yet, it does so without inviting its viewers to face their own cultural prejudices towards otherness or their internalised ableism.9

Vision is one of many modes of embodied interaction or mediation with others, which is both a physiological function of bodies who have the capacity to see and a culturally trained ability. Our visual functions as well as our abilities offer us meaningful connections with the world around us, but they also potentially fail us: vision exposes us to breakdowns, such as partiality, blindness, wounding or violence, as well as to pleasures. The mediation that takes place between my seeing and the objects I see is therefore prone to change how I see. If an artwork such as Quinn’s Alison Lapper Pregnant does not address the corporeal as well as the interactive dimension between my seeing and what I see, it will, unwillingly, uphold the discriminatory effects of my trained visual abilities, despite its call for change.

These effects are potentially amplified here by its material attributes: ‘The stabilising effect of the artwork’s surface quality enforces a seeming accuracy of vision, while vision itself, […] being under the constant threat of blindness, fails to see the complex (social and political) embodiment behind the clean façade.’10It is indeed not only the placement of the ‘disabled’ sculpture on the heroic plinth, but also the specific use of material, which disengages the viewer from a more intimate and possibly more personally engaging corporeal encounter with the portrayed subject: ‘If Quinn’s artistic and critical tool [here] is the aestheticisation of the disruptive body, independent of the chosen materiality, it also has its downside, which is its antagonism to aliveness, sensuality, and embodiedness.’11

In this case, disability art, or disability aesthetics, offers the artist a resource to make a political statement. Yet, in contrast to the lived embodiment of the portrayed subject, Quinn’s marble sculpture fails to fully employ the aesthetic value of disability12, which resides as much in disability’s chaotic and enigmatic appearance as in disability’s emotional and bodily affordances, which are experienced through fear, disgust as well as admiration. 1314Alison Lapper Pregnant offers us a view of disability, which exposes us to the fact that all embodiment is also a ‘public affair,’ and which claims for disabled embodiment specifically the right to visibility. Yet, I dare say that the sculpture does not offer us much artistic insights into how to practice art differently. How then can ‘disability’ be otherwise activated as a resource in and for art?15

I propose to engage with one specific aspect of disability’s important attributes: vulnerability. The main definitions of vulnerability as being ‘capable of being physically or emotionally wounded’ and as being ‘open to attack or damage’16express two important attributes of vulnerability which interest me here: vulnerability does not merely mean weakness or limitation, but by involving risk and uncertainty, it also features a radical exposure or openness to the world. Vulnerability is characteristic of all human embodiment and social life, yet should also be viewed as inherent in every form of embodied cultural practice, such as speaking, listening, reading, looking, and art making. Vulnerability therefore also embodies a (re)source for artists (and other subjects) to view their making and thinking practices as potentially risky, uncertain, and radically open to change.

In addition to the more common definitions of vulnerability, American philosopher Judith Butler claims that vulnerability is relational: ‘[Vulnerability] is not a subjective disposition. Rather, it characterises a relation to a field of objects, forces, and passions that impinge on or affect us in some way. As a way of being related to what is not me and not fully masterable, vulnerability is a kind of relationship that belongs to that ambiguous region in which receptivity and responsiveness are not clearly separable from one another, and not distinguished as separate moments in a sequence; indeed, where receptivity and responsiveness become the basis for mobilizing vulnerability rather than engaging in its destructive denial.’ 17

This means that vulnerability is not only a personal experience, but foremost a human social and embodied condition, in which the vulnerability of one subject is always dependent on other subjects’ encounters with vulnerability: ‘Butler makes a case for what she conceptualises as a shared social vulnerability, which must be recognised to reveal how strongly all of us are socially and politically enmeshed in our perception of each other.’18In addition, vulnerability becomes constructive only, when or if it elicits an experience of receptivity and responsiveness – which brings us back to art: in the (sensory) encounter with disability art, vulnerability can unfold its ‘promise’ through the art work’s demand not to look away and to relate with art’s own representational and material exposure to risk, destruction, decomposition, transformation, and potential misrecognition.

How can vulnerability, then, help us to productively participate in disability aesthetics? The critical connection between vulnerability and disability art lies in the specificity of what happens in the process of viewing (or producing) the art object. In contrast to the visual relation with other art objects, the process here is experienced as potentially more vulnerable, or prone to wounding and uncertainty, and has an influence on our ways of looking and our forms of perception. If we consider art as a mode of perception, we can consider disability in art (or disability aesthetics) as introducing new modes of perception concerning human embodiment: more vulnerable modes of perception.19In this respect, we can consider disability in art as a ‘tool for rethinking human appearance, intelligence, behaviour, and creativity.’20 Or, as a tool for re-doing our own looking in which disability and vulnerability form an enabling correlation for new and alternative visual practices.

Breath

Let me now introduce the second of Quinn’s sculptures, called Breath (2012; see image 2), which offers us a timely insight into the vulnerability of our shared embodied dependencies on the availability of clean air and the functioning of our breathing organs. The sculpture also compels us to reconsider our ways of perceiving disability through the experience of what we could call a ‘vulnerable art work.’ This sculpture is an eleven-metre inflatable version of the marble sculpture Alison Lapper Pregnant and was commissioned for the opening ceremony of the London 2012 Olympic Games and later exhibited by the Fondazione Giorgio Cini in Venice (2013). The sculpture is made of double-layer polyester, to be inflated by high-capacity air pumps. The technology used for this art work is capable of filling the sculpture with air within seconds, which creates an almost magical sense of importance in the viewer, while prompting the recognition of the art work’s potential instability and risk of perforation and deflation.

Yet, the sculpture’s material difference to its original model (Alison Lapper Pregnant) is not only characterised by its potentially vulnerable engineering aspects (which are clearly prone to failure), but also by its haptic manifestation: the original model was photographed, printed on cloth, cut into pieces, and sewn together to create a colored and textured 3D-feeling. According to Quinn, the artwork articulates ‘the difference between an object with mass and gravity, and its image or presence in mass culture.’ Quinn ‘sees the work as a cultural hallucination or a “cultural image of the sculpture literalised as an inflatable”.’ What Quinn alludes to is the insight that images of disability in mass culture are not congruent with the physical bodies or their artistic materialisation; by recognising this incongruity, Quinn transposes his own representation of Alison Lapper as marble sculpture into a hyper-representation (or hallucination) not of Alison Lapper’s body, but of her sculpture.

Quinn thereby acknowledges the gap, and the potential violence, mass culture exerts on our bodies through representation; yet he also uses his art to aesthetically intervene into this form of representational mediation of disabled bodies, by making his artwork, rather than Lapper’s body, the ‘victim’ of the representational gap. Simultaneously, he appeals to the viewers’ bodily and sensory response to the chosen material, technology, and overall form of presentation. The inflatable sculpture calls attention not only to the represented subject’s disabled body, but also to artistic choices about how to direct the viewers’ looks at disability and art. It similarly shows how art can involve viewers (or the makers) in the production of their own sight and how to elicit feelings of vulnerability that are shared by the artistic object and the looking subject.

What, then, does this artwork offer us in terms of artistic resources? It is not only the difference in material, presentation, technology, colour, or texture that makes a difference between the two sculptures discussed here. But it is also the artworks’ exposure to what Mieke Bal calls ‘embodied reflection’ that changes the way we look. Bal ascribes to artists the capacity to ‘mobilise art for an embodied reflection’.23 ‘Art that motivates embodied reflection, or involved looking, not only inaugurates an ethically valuable form of looking—by appealing to the viewer’s responsibility in the creation of the image—but it also makes room for the visual object’s agency in the perceived image.’24 Or, in other words: specific art objects have the capacity to influence how we look and what we perceive by appealing to the viewer’s own bodily involvement in both processes.

When watching Breath inflate to its full size within less than two minutes on a huge stone platform on the island of San Giorgio Maggiore in Venice, one cannot avoid feeling touched by the immense sculpture’s fragility, aliveness, softness, and fleshliness.
b25qd7uTRgc
This feeling is also motivated by the artwork’s skin-like texture, its growth from a heap of fabric through an embryonic posture to a sitting position, and by its continuous air intake, which appeal to basic bodily experiences we all share. How, then, does this impact on our practices of looking and on our participation in the production of alternative visions? Tobin Siebers is convinced that ‘the artwork makes us feel because of its unique physical properties, because of the way that it stands among us as a distinct physical manifestation. Art perception involves both perception of the artwork and self-perception.’25

Conclusion

In this essay, I made an attempt to consider more responsive and responsible forms of perception, which help to ‘reflect’ the world and ourselves through the shared experience of embodied vulnerability. To transform one’s own practice of looking, trained, for example, by engaging in disability art and vulnerability will be a potentially radical tool in one’s own art-making practices and in what such art-making can provoke. Technological changes in artistic tools, such as 3D graphics, photographic technologies and digital presentation formats, have reordered our relationship between visual perception and spatial and bodily experience. By introducing ‘tools’ such as vulnerability and disability aesthetics to our art making and visual practices, we will also, more critically, reorder artistic impact on the meaning making of ‘disability’ and other forms of culturally excluded forms of diverse and variant embodiment.

In addition to exploring the ways in which certain art objects expose us to the vulnerability of ourselves and others, I hoped to have shown that such exposure can lead to embodied reflection, which in turn has the capacity to transform those (visual-cultural) practices we commonly use to produce and receive art. The goal must be to trouble our own looking, and thereby to produce forms of art that will eventually trouble visual culture for more diverse and just ways of looking at others.

DIY relational vulnerability assignments. With a few super simple suggestions of a question to ask from your art work

Jules Sturm teaches and researches at the Zurich University of the Arts (ZHdK) and at various art schools in the Netherlands in the fields of art education, critical studies and transdisciplinarity. Jules is interested in embodied theories and alternative knowledge production in contemporary culture and education, particularly in committed forms of teaching and learning from, within and beyond diversity.

Notes

1 Tobin Siebers, In Levin, Mike, ‘The Art of Disability: An Interview with Tobin Siebers.’ In Disability Studies Quarterly, Vol. 30/2 (2010).
2 Tobin Siebers, ‘Disability Representation and the Political Dimension of Art,’ DESIGNABILITIES. Design Research Journal for Bodies, Things & Interaction (2014).
3 Ibid
4 Tobin Siebers develops the concept of disability aesthetics as a critique of aesthetic standards and tastes that exclude people with disabilities. Instead, he argues: ‘The idea of disability aesthetics affirms that disability operates both as a critical framework for questioning aesthetic presuppositions in the history of art and as a value in its own right important to future conceptions of what art is.’ (Siebers 2008, pp. 71-2) I use the notion of disability aesthetics here in an additional sense, by claiming that in aesthetic encounters we do not only involve our emotions and senses, but we also engage in specific bodily and cultural practices, such as seeing, reading, speaking, sculpting and writing. According to a disability approach to aesthetics, these should also be rethought and practised differently when looking at or when making art.
5 Siebers 2014.
6 Jules Sturm, Bodies We Fail. Productive Embodiments of Imperfection (Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag, 2014), p. 77-79.
7 Judith Butler, Zeynep Gambetti, and Leticia Sabsay, eds. Vulnerability in Resistance (Duke University Press, 2016), p. 19.
8 Gail Weiss, Body Images: Embodiment as Intercorporeality (New York: Routledge, 1999), p. 158.
9 ‘Ableism is “a network of beliefs, processes and practices that produces a particular kind of self and body (the corporeal standard) that is projected as the perfect, species-typical and therefore essential and fully human. Disability then is cast as a diminished state of being human”. (Campbell 2001: 44) Ableism systematically interacts with other power structures that stigmatise to produce race, gender, sex, and disability. Ableism shapes our world and produces disability.’ Melinda C. Hall, ‘Critical Disability Theory,’ Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2019 edition), https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/disability-critical/.
10 Sturm 2014, p. 80.
11 Sturm 2014, p. 81.
12 Siebers 2014.
13 Andries Hiskes, ‘The Affective Affordances of Disability,’ Digressions: Amsterdam Journal of Critical Theory, Cultural Analysis, and Creative Writing 3.2 (2019): pp. 5-17.
14 See Merriam Webster’s definition of affordance: ‘The quality or property of an object that defines its possible uses or makes clear how it can or should be used.’ See Hiskes on disability’s affective affordances: ‘I define affective affordances as the way in which the form of the representation of disability may evoke affective responses such as fear, disgust, and admiration in viewers and readers.’ (Hiskes 2019, p. 5)
15 If we define disability as providing new resources for art makers, we must be careful – as with other experience- and identity-based qualities and reserves – not to: 1) instrumentalise disability for the sake of artistic (marketable) profit; 2) use the experience and appearance of people with disabilities as ‘inspiration’ to our art-making (Stella Young, inspiration porn); 3) employ disability as a metaphor for ‘otherness’ and ‘exoticism’ (Mitchell & Davis). Without wanting to presume Quinn’s own bearing on disability politics, his artworks suggest a certain inspirational stance towards disability.
16 ‘Vulnerable,’ Merriam Webster, www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vulnerability.
17 Butler in Butler, Gambetti, and Sabsay 2016, p. 25.
18 Sturm 2014, p. 65.
19 In contrast to, or in addition to, James Elkin’s revealing theory of how acts of seeing transform the seen object as well as the seeing subject (Elkins 1997), I here argue that acts of seeing disability in art transform our seeing.
20 Siebers in Levin 2010
21 The artwork’s title did not have the same brisance in 2012 as it currently has in the era of the Covid-19 pandemic. Writing this essay in early 2021 makes me more acutely aware of the necessity of a ‘critical aesthetic,’ an aesthetic which not only changes the representations of embodied human reality, but also of the way we perceive the world around us by way of bodily urgencies. For more reading on breath and vulnerability, refer to Magdalena Gorska’s ‘Breathing Matters’ (2016). Please also refer to Angelo Custódio’s valuable artistic work on breathing as embodied dialogue (2021). Custódio’s work is an important contribution to disability aesthetics in performative and sonic art in that “it explores the performative use of the voice to develop sonic encounters with the vulnerable”: http://foursistersproject.nl/en/calendar/breathing-sites-by-angelo-custodio-yara-said/.
22 Taken from Marc Quinn’s website.
23 Mieke Bal, ‘The Commitment to Look,’ Journal of Visual Culture 4/2 (2005): p. 153. Emphasis in original.
24 Sturm 2014, p. 81.
25 Siebers in Levin 2010.

Bibliography

‘Affordance.’ Merriam Webster. www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/affordance.

Bal, Mieke, ‘The Commitment to Look.’ Journal of Visual Culture 4/2 (2005): pp. 145-62.

Butler, Judith, Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence. London/New York: Verso, 2006.

Butler, Judith, Zeynep Gambetti, and Leticia Sabsay, eds. Vulnerability in Resistance. Duke University Press, 2016.

Campbell, Fiona A. Kumari, ‘Inciting Legal Fictions: Disability's Date with Ontology and the Ableist Body of the Law.’ In Griffith Law Review 10, 2001: 42–62.

Custódio, Angelo & Said, Yara, ‘Breathing /sites’. foursistersproject.nl/en/calendar/breathing-sites-by-angelo-custodio-yara-said/

Diamond, Sara, ‘Physics, Perception, Immersion: Introduction.’ In Euphoria and Dystopia: The Banff New Media Institute Dialogues, edited by Sarah Cook and Sara Diamond. Riverside Architectural Press, 2020: pp. 170-198.

Elkins, James, The Object Stares Back: On the Nature of Seeing. Mariner Books: 1997.

Górska, Magdalena, Breathing Matters: Feminist Inter-Sectional Politics of Vulnerability. Linköping Studies in Arts and Science: Linköping University, 2016.

Hall, Melinda C., ‘Critical Disability Theory.’ Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2019 edition). plato.stanford.edu/entries/disability-critical/.

Hiskes, Andries, ‘The Affective Affordances of Disability.’ Digressions: Amsterdam Journal of Critical Theory, Cultural Analysis, and Creative Writing 3.2 (2019): pp. 5-17.

Levin, Mike, ‘The Art of Disability: An Interview with Tobin Siebers.’ In Disability Studies Quarterly, Vol. 30/2 (2010).

Mitchell, W. J. T., ‘Seeing Disability.’ Public Culture 13/3 (2001): pp. 391-97.

Quinn, Marc, ‘Artworks: Breath.’ marcquinn.com/artworks/single/breath.

Shildrick, Margrit. Embodying the Monster: Encounters with the Vulnerable Self. London: Sage, 2002.

Siebers, Tobin, ‘Disability Aesthetics and the Body Beautiful: Signposts in the History of Art.’ ALTER, European Journal of Disability Research No. 2 (2008): pp. 329–336.

Siebers, Tobin, ‘Disability Representation and the political Dimension of Art.’ DESIGNABILITIES. Design Research Journal for Bodies, Things & Interaction (2014).

Sturm, Jules, Bodies We Fail. Productive Embodiments of Imperfection. Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag, 2014.

‘Vulnerable.’ Merriam Webster. www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vulnerability.

Weiss, Gail, Body Images: Embodiment as Intercorporeality. New York: Routledge, 1999.
Marc Quinn, Breath, 2012/2013, Venice www.youtube.com/watch?v=b25qd7uTRgc

Kwetsbaar Kijken

Jules Sturm schrijft in dit essay over het kwetsbare lichaam in de kunst. Zij probeert antwoorden te vinden op de vraag hoe kunst, handicap en kwetsbaarheid zich op constructieve wijze tot elkaar kunnen verhouden. Hoe kan ‘handicap’ niet alleen de manier waarop we ons voelen veranderen, maar ook de manier waarop we kijken naar anderen, naar onszelf en naar de kunst die we maken? Wat kan ‘kwetsbaarheid’ als tool voor de kunstenaar betekenen?

Het essay zal in de oorspronkelijke Engelse tekst onderdeel uitmaken van de online publicatie Powertools, een uitgave van ArtEZ studium generale die in voorjaar 2022 zal verschijnen over de relatie tussen kunst en sociaal-politieke kwesties van macht, inclusie en uitsluiting. De essays zijn allemaal geschreven met de bedoeling om theoretische concepten die relevant zijn voor diversiteit en inclusie toegankelijk te maken: concepten die kunstenaars kunnen gebruiken als hulpmiddel bij het ontwerpen, bouwen of maken of door docenten binnen het kunstvakonderwijs.

Dit essay is vertaald vanuit het Engels door Jesse Lemmens


Een kunstvoorwerp is een lichaam dat andere lichamen laat voelen.1

Het uiterlijk van een handicap is chaotisch, mooi, raadselachtig – een kracht die de geschiedenis van de kunst en onze perceptie van de wereld verandert. Een handicap is een esthetische waarde op zich.2


Wanneer kritische handicap-theoreticus Tobin Siebers de handicap ‘het esthetische object dat moderne kunst mogelijk maakt’ noemt3, laat hij ons nadenken over welke ideeën we hebben over kunst en handicaps. Aan de hand van twee kunstwerken van de Britse kunstenaar Marc Quinn zal ik een poging doen tot een heroverweging met een specifiek doel: het introduceren van het concept van kwetsbaarheid als een hulpmiddel om opnieuw, of op een nieuwe wijze, verbinding te zoeken met ons begrip van kijken naar het menselijk lichaam.
Het doel van dit essay is om gedeeltelijke en zo mogelijk meerdere antwoorden te vinden op deze vragen: Hoe verhouden kunst, handicap en kwetsbaarheid zich op constructieve wijze tot elkaar? Hoe kan ‘handicap’ niet alleen de manier waarop we ons voelen veranderen, maar ook de manier waarop we kijken naar anderen, naar onszelf en naar de kunst die we maken? En tot slot, hoe kan het begrip kwetsbaarheid – naast de individuele ervaring en de universele menselijke conditie van kwetsbaarheid – een hulpmiddel worden voor kunstenaars in het maakproces?

De beroemde sculpturen van Marc Quinn (zie bovenstaande afbeeldingen) van Alison Lapper, een beeldend kunstenaar met een ernstige handicap aan de ledematen, zijn monumentaal, strak en esthetisch aangenaam om naar te kijken. Ze zijn ook uitdagend vanwege de naaktheid, de vergevorderde zwangerschap en de bijna neerbuigende blik die ze vertonen. De sculpturen betwisten een sociale afspraak over welk type kunst toelaatbaar is om publiek te worden getoond. Hoewel ongebruikelijk, werd het werk van Quinn, geïnspireerd door een handicap, geaccepteerd als ‘openbare kunst’. Dergelijke acceptatie is een goede gelegenheid om de (verstorende) effecten van deze kunstwerken op hun toeschouwers nader te bekijken en hun creatieve potentieel te verkennen. Wat kunnen we leren van het analyseren van Quinns controversiële kunst? En wat hebben we eraan om ons bezig te houden met wat ik ‘disability-esthetiek’ noem?4

In een interview legt Siebers uit: “Hoe meer een kunstwerk een handicap bevat, hoe groter de kans [ … ] om de lichaamspolitiek te veranderen.” 5Het is duidelijk , het doel van het gebruik van ‘disability’-esthetiek is om samenlevingen te veranderen waarin lichamelijke en cognitieve handicaps hebben afgedaan als niets anders dan een afwijking van de natuur. Mijn analyse is daarom bedoeld om te onthullen hoe we productief kunnen deelnemen aan esthetische praktijken die het geloof in lichamelijke verschillen als afwijking tegenspreken en deze in plaats daarvan behandelen als variatie van de menselijke natuur.

Mijn uitgangspunt is dat deelnemen aan een dergelijk streven nooit een simpele kwestie is van het succes of falen van een kunstwerk, maar een zorgvuldige, langzame en soms frustrerende betrokkenheid inhoudt bij het her-overwegen en af-leren van alle praktijken, materiële verplichtingen, zintuigen en actoren die betrokken zijn bij het productieproces van een kunstwerk. Ik hoop hiermee bij te dragen aan het uitbreiden van een toolkit voor het maken van kunst en het visueel denken over een meer inclusieve en diverse esthetiek. Ik zal hier twee van Marc Quinns sculpturen van Alison Lapper, Alison Lapper Pregnant (afbeelding 1) en Breath (afbeelding 2) gebruiken als voorbeelden van kunst met een handicap, die me helpen onthullen hoe dergelijke praktijken ontwikkeld kunnen worden.

Relationele Kwetsbaarheid

Laat me beginnen met de eerste sculptuur te introduceren: ‘ [ … ] Alison Lapper Pregnant [ is een ] marmeren beeld van meer dan drie meter hoog. Het beeld toont de kunstenaar Alison Lapper naakt en acht maanden zwanger. Achttien maanden (september 2005-april 2007) was ze in Londen te zien op de vierde sokkel van Trafalgar Square. Quinns sculptuur, gepositioneerd in het drukke centrum van Londen naast ruiterstandbeelden van helden van het Britse rijk als Lord Nelson, toont een zelfverzekerde, bijna krijger-achtige vrouw, die lijdt aan focomelie, een aangeboren aandoening waardoor ze werd geboren met verkorte benen en zonder armen of handen. Lapper, uitgehakt als een standbeeld in strak wit Italiaans marmer, is afgebeeld als een aanstaande moeder met een gehandicapt lichaam. Het werk veroorzaakte enige controverse: het beeld zou krachtig en inspirerend zijn, maar ook lelijk en weerzinwekkend. Het roept gevoelens van schaamte op over de naaktheid van de zwangere vrouw maar lokt ook fascinerende reacties uit die ingaan op empowerment voor mensen met een handicap. Alison Lappers eigen kunst heeft tot doel handicap, vrouwelijkheid en moederschap op de kaart van publieke erkenning te plaatsen. De vraag is enkel of deze voorstelling van haar als een gehandicapt, moederlijk subject erin slaagt om conventionele esthetische idealen te destabiliseren en manieren om naar gehandicapte lichamen in het openbaar te kijken te betwisten?’ 6

Ik geloof dat Quinns marmeren sculptuur zijn kijkers niet uitnodigt om een lichamelijke relatie aan te gaan met wat het vertegenwoordigt: een gehandicapte zwangere moeder in spe; een ander lichaam. Laten we lichamelijkheid definiëren als ons eigen gevoel van belichaming in de wereld en als onze zintuiglijke en affectieve ontmoetingen met andere lichamen. Zo bezien onthult lichamelijkheid dat ‘het lichaam minder een entiteit [ of object ] is, dan een relatie’, waarin het alléén tot stand komt op basis van zijn verbindingen met andere lichamen en op basis van de ondersteuning van omgevingsfactoren en infrastructurele levensomstandigheden.7

In die zin is lichamelijkheid ‘intercorporaliteit’, wat benadrukt dat ‘de ervaring van belichaamd te zijn nooit een privéaangelegenheid is, maar altijd al wordt bemiddeld door onze voortdurende interacties met andere menselijke en niet-menselijke lichamen.’8 De sculptuur daagt ontegenzeggelijk conventionele opvattingen over gehandicapte lichamen en moederschap uit en claimt publieke erkenning van zogenaamde ontwrichtende lichamen. Toch doet het dit zonder zijn kijkers uit te nodigen om hun eigen culturele vooroordelen over anders-zijn of hun geïnternaliseerde validisme9 onder ogen te zien.10

Het zintuig zicht is een van de vele vormen van belichaamde interactie of bemiddeling met anderen, die zowel een fysiologische functie is van lichamen met het vermogen om te zien als een cultureel aangeleerd vermogen. Ons gezichtsvermogen en de andere capaciteiten die we ter beschikking hebben bieden ons zinvolle verbindingen aan met de wereld om ons heen. Desalniettemin kunnen ze ons ook in de steek laten: gezichtsvermogen stelt ons bloot aan storingen zoals partijdigheid, blindheid, verwonding of geweld, maar het toont ons ook plezier. De bemiddeling die tussen mijn zien en de objecten die ik zie plaatsvindt is dan ook geneigd om te veranderen hoe ik zie. Als een kunstwerk als Quinns Alison Lapper Pregnant niet zowel de lichamelijke als de interactieve dimensie tussen mijn zien en wat ik zie aan de orde stelt, zal het, ongewild, de discriminerende effecten van mijn aangeleerde visuele vermogens in stand houden, ondanks zijn oproep tot verandering.

Deze effecten worden hier mogelijk versterkt door de materiële eigenschappen van het kunstwerk: “Het stabiliserende effect van de oppervlaktekwaliteit van het kunstwerk dwingt een schijnbare nauwkeurigheid van het zicht af, terwijl het zicht zelf, [ … ] constant bedreigd door verblinding, er niet in slaagt de complexe (sociale en politieke) belichaming achter de schone façade te zien.”11 Het is inderdaad niet alleen de plaatsing van de ‘gehandicapte’ sculptuur op de heroïsche sokkel maar ook het specifieke materiaalgebruik dat de kijker losmaakt van een meer intieme en mogelijk meer persoonlijke en lichamelijke ontmoeting met het geportretteerde subject: “Als Quinns artistieke en kritische hulpmiddel [hier ] de esthetisering van het ontwrichtende lichaam is, onafhankelijk van de gekozen materialiteit, heeft dit ook een keerzijde, die de tegenhanger van levendigheid, sensualiteit en belichaming is.”11

In dit geval biedt disability-kunst (dus kunst die kritisch is over validisme), of disability-esthetiek, de kunstenaar een middel om een politiek statement te maken. Maar in tegenstelling tot de geleefde belichaming van het geportretteerde onderwerp, slaagt Quinns marmeren sculptuur er niet in om de esthetische waarde van het gehandicapt zijn, volledig te benutten.12 Die schuilt evenzeer in het chaotische en raadselachtige uiterlijk van een handicap als in de emotionele en zintuiglijke mogelijkheden die het oproept13, die zowel door angst, walging als bewondering kunnen worden ervaren.1415Alison Lapper Pregnant biedt ons een kijk op gehandicapt-zijn die ons blootstelt aan het feit dat elke belichaming ook een ‘publieke aangelegenheid’ is en die voor gehandicapte belichaming specifiek het recht op zichtbaarheid claimt. Toch durf ik te stellen dat de sculptuur ons niet veel artistieke inzichten biedt over hoe je kunst anders kunt uitoefenen. Hoe kan ‘handicap’ dan anders worden geactiveerd als hulpbron in en voor kunst?16

Ik stel voor om in te gaan op één specifiek aspect van handicaps en hun belangrijke kenmerken: kwetsbaarheid. Kwetsbaarheid als ‘in staat zijn om fysiek of emotioneel gewond te raken’ en als ‘openstaan voor aanvallen of schade’17drukken twee noties van kwetsbaarheid uit die me hier interesseren. Het betekent niet alleen zwakte of beperking maar doordat het ook risico en onzekerheid met zich meebrengt, kenmerkt het zich ook door een radicale blootstelling aan of openheid naar de wereld. Kwetsbaarheid is kenmerkend voor alle menselijke belichaming en het sociale leven, maar moet ook gezien worden als inherent aan elke vorm van belichaamde culturele praktijk zoals spreken, luisteren, lezen, kijken en het maken van kunst. Het belichaamt en biedt daarom ook een bron voor kunstenaars (en andere subjecten) om hun maak- en denkpraktijken te bezien als potentieel riskant, onzeker en radicaal open voor verandering.

In aanvulling op de meer algemene definities van kwetsbaarheid, betoogt de Amerikaanse filosofe Judith Butler dat kwetsbaarheid relationeel is: ‘ [ Kwetsbaarheid ] is niet van subjectieve aard. Het kenmerkt eerder een relatie met een veld van objecten, krachten en passies, die ons op de een of andere manier raken of beïnvloeden. Als een manier om gerelateerd te zijn aan wat ik niet ben en wat niet volledig beheersbaar is, is kwetsbaarheid een soort relatie die behoort tot dat ambigue gebied waarin ontvankelijkheid en responsiviteit niet duidelijk van elkaar te scheiden zijn en niet worden onderscheiden als afzonderlijke momenten in een reeks. Het behoort inderdaad tot dat gebied waar ontvankelijkheid en responsiviteit de basis worden voor het mobiliseren van kwetsbaarheid in plaats van zich bezig te houden met de destructieve ontkenning ervan.’18

Dit betekent dat kwetsbaarheid niet alleen een persoonlijke ervaring is, maar vooral een menselijke sociale en belichaamde toestand, waarin de kwetsbaarheid van het ene subject altijd afhankelijk is van de ontmoetingen van andere subjecten met kwetsbaarheid: ‘Butler pleit voor wat zij omschrijft als een gedeelde sociale kwetsbaarheid, die moet worden erkend om te laten zien hoe sterk we allemaal sociaal en politiek verstrikt zijn in onze perceptie van elkaar.’19Bovendien wordt kwetsbaarheid alléén constructief, wanneer het een ervaring van ontvankelijkheid en responsiviteit oproept, wat ons terugbrengt naar kunst. In de (zintuiglijke) ontmoeting met disability-kunst kan kwetsbaarheid haar ‘belofte’ waarmaken door de eis van het kunstwerk om niet weg te kijken maar zich juist te verhouden tot de representatieve en materiële blootstelling aan risico’s, vernietiging, ontbinding, transformatie en mogelijke verkeerde herkenning.

Hoe kan kwetsbaarheid ons dan helpen om productief deel te nemen aan disability-esthetiek? De kritische verbinding tussen kwetsbaarheid en disability kunst ligt in de specificiteit van wat er gebeurt in het proces van het bekijken (of produceren) van het kunstobject. In tegenstelling tot de visuele relatie met andere kunstobjecten wordt het proces hier ervaren als potentieel kwetsbaarder, of vatbaarder voor verwonding en onzekerheid en heeft het invloed op onze manier van kijken en onze vormen van perceptie. Als we kunst beschouwen als een manier van waarnemen, kunnen we een handicap in de kunst (of disability-esthetiek) beschouwen als de introductie van nieuwe manieren van waarnemen met betrekking tot de menselijke belichaming: de introductie van meer kwetsbare vormen van waarneming.20In dit opzicht kunnen we handicaps in de kunst beschouwen als een ‘instrument om het menselijk uiterlijk, de intelligentie, het gedrag en de creativiteit te heroverwegen’.21Of, als een hulpmiddel om onze eigen blik te herzien waarin handicap en kwetsbaarheid een stimulerende samenhang vormen voor nieuwe en alternatieve visuele praktijken.

Adem

Sta me toe nu de tweede van Quinns sculpturen te introduceren, genaamd Breath (2012; zie afbeelding 2), dat ons een tijdig inzicht biedt in de kwetsbaarheid van onze gedeelde belichaamde afhankelijkheid van de beschikbaarheid van schone lucht en het functioneren van onze ademhalingsorganen.22 De sculptuur dwingt ons ook om onze kijk op handicaps te heroverwegen door de ervaring van wat we een ‘kwetsbaar kunstwerk’ zouden kunnen noemen. Deze sculptuur is een elf meter lange opblaasbare versie van de marmeren sculptuur Alison Lapper Pregnant en werd gemaakt voor de openingsceremonie van de Olympische Spelen van 2012 in Londen en later tentoongesteld door de Fondazione Giorgio Cini in Venetië (2013). De sculptuur is gemaakt van dubbellaags polyester, op te blazen door middel van krachtige luchtpompen. De technologie die voor dit kunstwerk wordt gebruikt, is in staat om de sculptuur binnen enkele seconden met lucht te vullen, wat een bijna magisch gevoel bij de kijker creëert voor iets van groot belang, terwijl gelijktijdig de potentiële instabiliteit van het kunstwerk en het risico van perforatie en leeglopen en in elkaar zakken wordt herkend.

Toch wordt het materiële verschil van deze sculptuur met het oorspronkelijke model (Alison Lapper Pregnant) niet alleen gekenmerkt door zijn potentieel kwetsbare technische aspecten (die duidelijk feilbaar zijn), maar ook door zijn haptische manifestatie: het originele model werd gefotografeerd, gedrukt op doek, in stukken gesneden en aan elkaar genaaid om een gekleurd en textuurmatig 3D-gevoel te creëren. Volgens Quinn articuleert het kunstwerk ‘het verschil tussen een object met massa en zwaartekracht en zijn beeld of aanwezigheid in de massacultuur.’ Quinn ‘ziet het werk als een culturele hallucinatie of een “cultureel beeld van de sculptuur, letterlijk als opblaaspop”.’23 Waar Quinn op zinspeelt, is het inzicht dat beelden van handicaps in de massacultuur niet overeenstemmen met de fysieke lichamen of hun artistieke materialisatie; door deze ongerijmdheid te erkennen, transponeert Quinn zijn eigen voorstelling van Alison Lapper als marmeren sculptuur in een hyperrepresentatie (of hallucinatie), niet van het lichaam van Alison Lapper, maar van haar sculptuur.

Quinn erkent daarmee niet alleen de kloof, maar ook het potentiële geweld dat de massacultuur door middel van representatie op ons lichaam uitoefent; toch gebruikt hij zijn kunst ook om esthetisch in te grijpen in deze vorm van representatieve bemiddeling van gehandicapte lichamen door zijn kunstwerk, in plaats van Lappers lichaam, het ‘slachtoffer’ van de representatieve kloof te maken. Tegelijkertijd doet hij een beroep op de lichamelijke en zintuiglijke reactie van de kijker op het gekozen materiaal, de technologie en de algehele vorm van presentatie. De opblaasbare sculptuur vestigt niet alleen de aandacht op het gehandicapte lichaam van de afgebeelde persoon, maar ook op artistieke keuzes van hoe de maker de kijker naar handicap en kunst laat kijkt. Evenzo laat het zien hoe kunst de kijker (of de maker) kan betrekken bij de productie van zijn eigen zicht en hoe gevoelens van kwetsbaarheid kunnen worden opgeroepen die gedeeld worden door het artistieke object en het kijkende subject.

Wat biedt dit kunstwerk ons dan in termen van artistieke middelen? Het is niet alleen het verschil in materiaal, presentatie, technologie, kleur of textuur dat het verschil maakt tussen de twee hier besproken sculpturen. Het is ook de blootstelling van de kunstwerken aan wat Mieke Bal ‘belichaamde reflectie’ noemt, die de manier waarop we kijken verandert. Bal schrijft kunstenaars het vermogen toe om ‘kunst te mobiliseren voor een belichaamde reflectie’.24 ‘Kunst die motiveert tot belichaamde reflectie, of een betrokken manier van kijken, maakt niet alleen een ethisch waardevolle vorm van kijken mogelijk – door een beroep te doen op de verantwoordelijkheid van de kijker bij het creëren van het beeld – maar het maakt ook ruimte voor de invloed van het visuele object in het waargenomen beeld.’25 Of anders gezegd: specifieke kunstwerken kunnen invloed uitoefenen op hoe we kijken en wat we waarnemen door een beroep te doen op de eigen lichamelijke betrokkenheid van de kijker bij beide processen.

Als je Breath in minder dan twee minuten tot zijn volledige grootte ziet opblazen op een enorm stenen platform op het eiland San Giorgio Maggiore in Venetië, kan je het niet helpen ontroerd te raken door de fragiliteit, levendigheid, zachtheid en vleselijkheid van de immense sculptuur.

Dit gevoel wordt ook ingegeven door de huidachtige textuur van het kunstwerk, de groei van een hoop stof via een embryonale houding tot een zittende positie en door de continue luchtinname, die een beroep doen op fundamentele lichamelijke ervaringen die we allemaal delen. Hoe beïnvloedt dit dan onze kijkpraktijken en onze deelname aan de productie van alternatieve visies? Tobin Siebers is ervan overtuigd dat ‘het kunstwerk ons laat voelen vanwege zijn unieke fysieke eigenschappen, vanwege de manier waarop het tussen ons staat als een duidelijke fysieke manifestatie. Bij kunstperceptie gaat het zowel om perceptie van het kunstwerk als om zelfperceptie.’26
b25qd7uTRgc
In dit essay heb ik een poging gedaan om meer responsieve en verantwoordelijke vormen van perceptie te overwegen die helpen om op de wereld en onszelf te ‘reflecteren’ door de gedeelde ervaring van belichaamde kwetsbaarheid. Het transformeren van de eigen kijkpraktijk, getraind, bijvoorbeeld, door je bezig te houden met disability-kunst en kwetsbaarheid, kan een potentieel radicaal hulpmiddel zijn in de eigen kunstpraktijk en in wat een dergelijke manier van kunst maken kan uitlokken. Technologische veranderingen in artistieke hulpmiddelen, zoals 3D-graphics, fotografische technologieën en digitale presentatieformats, hebben onze relatie tussen visuele waarneming en ruimtelijke en lichamelijke ervaring opnieuw geordend. Door ‘gereedschappen’ zoals kwetsbaarheid en disability-esthetiek in onze kunst- en visuele praktijken te introduceren, zullen we ook meer kritisch de artistieke impact op de betekenisgeving van ‘handicap’ en andere cultureel uitgesloten vormen van diverse belichaming herordenen.

Naast het onderzoeken van de manieren waarop bepaalde kunstobjecten ons blootstellen aan de kwetsbaarheid van onszelf en anderen, hoop ik hier te hebben aangetoond dat een dergelijke blootstelling kan leiden tot belichaamde reflectie. Een soort reflectie die op zijn beurt het vermogen heeft om die (visueel-culturele) praktijken te transformeren die we meestal gebruiken om kunst te maken en te ontvangen. Het doel moet zijn om ons eigen kijken te bemoeilijken en daarmee kunst te produceren die uiteindelijk de visuele cultuur zullen prikkelen tot meer diverse en rechtvaardige manieren om naar anderen te kijken.

Noten

1Tobin Siebers, In Levin, Mike, ‘The Art of Disability: An Interview with Tobin Siebers.’ In Disability Studies Quarterly, Vol. 30/2 (2010).
2Tobin Siebers, ‘Disability Representation and the Political Dimension of Art,’ DESIGNABILITIES. Design Research Journal for Bodies, Things & Interaction (2014).
3Ibid.
4Tobin Siebers ontwikkelt het concept van de disability-esthetiek als een kritiek op esthetische normen en voorkeuren, die mensen met een handicap uitsluiten. In plaats daarvan stelt hij: 'Het idee van de disability-esthetiek bevestigt dat handicap zowel fungeert als een kritisch kader voor het ter discussie stellen van esthetische vooronderstellingen in de kunstgeschiedenis, en als een op zichzelf staande waarde die belangrijk is voor toekomstige opvattingen over wat kunst is.' (Siebers 2008, pp. 71-2) Ik gebruik de notie van disability-esthetiek hier in aanvullende zin, door te beweren dat we bij esthetische ontmoetingen niet alleen onze emoties en zintuigen betrekken, maar dat we ons ook bezighouden met specifieke lichamelijke en culturele praktijken, zoals zien, lezen, spreken, beeldhouwen en schrijven. Volgens de disability-esthetiek moeten deze ook worden heroverwogen en anders worden beoefend bij het kijken naar of bij het maken van kunst.
5Siebers, 2014.
6Jules Sturm, Bodies We Fail. Productive Embodiments of Imperfection (Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag, 2014), p. 77-79.
7Judith Butler, Zeynep Gambetti, en Leticia Sabsay, eds. Vulnerability in Resistance (Duke University Press, 2016), p. 19.
8Gail Weiss, Body Images: Embodiment as Intercorporeality (New York: Routledge, 1999), p. 158.
9Validisme is de Nederlandse vertaling van het Engelse woord ableism, en wordt gebruikt om discriminatie, marginalisering en stigmatisering van mensen met een functiebeperking op grond van hun lichamelijke, verstandelijke en/of psychische gesteldheid aan te duiden.
10'Ableism is “een netwerk van overtuigingen, processen en praktijken die een bepaald soort zelf en lichaam (de lichamelijke standaard) voortbrengen dat wordt geprojecteerd als het perfecte, soortspecifieke en daarom essentieel en volledig menselijk. Een handicap wordt dan voorgesteld als een verminderde staat van mens-zijn”. (Campbell 2001: 44) Ableism interageert systematisch met andere machtsstructuren die stigmatiseren om ras, geslacht, geslacht en handicap te produceren. Ableism vormt onze wereld en veroorzaakt handicaps.' Melinda C. Hall, 'Critical Disability Theory', Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (editie winter 2019), plato.stanford.edu/entries/disability-critical/ .
11Sturm 2014, p. 80.
12Sturm 2014, p. 81.
13Siebers 2014.
14Andries Hiskes, ‘The Affective Affordances of Disability,’ Digressions: Amsterdam Journal of Critical Theory, Cultural Analysis, and Creative Writing 3.2 (2019): pp. 5-17.
15Zie Merriam Webster's definitie van ’affordance’: 'De kwaliteit of eigenschap van een object die het mogelijke gebruik definieert of duidelijk maakt hoe het kan of moet worden gebruikt.' Zie Hiskes over de affectieve eigenschappen van handicaps: 'Ik definieer affectieve voordelen als de manier waarop de vorm van de representatie van een handicap affectieve reacties zoals angst, walging en bewondering kan oproepen bij kijkers en lezers.' (Hiskes 2019, p. 5)
16Als we een handicap definiëren als het verschaffen van nieuwe middelen voor kunstenaars, moeten we voorzichtig zijn - net als bij andere op ervaring en identiteit gebaseerde kwaliteiten en reserves - om niet: 1) handicap te instrumentaliseren omwille van artistieke (verhandelbare) winst; 2) de ervaring en het uiterlijk van mensen met een handicap als 'inspiratie' voor het maken van kunst te gebruiken (Stella Young, inspiratieporno); 3) handicap te gebruiken als metafoor voor 'anders zijn' en 'exotisme' (Mitchell & Davis). Zonder de eigen invloed van Quinn op de politiek van gehandicapten te willen veronderstellen, suggereren zijn kunstwerken een bepaalde inspirerende houding ten opzichte van handicaps.
17‘Vulnerability’, Merriam Webster , www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vulnerability .
18Butler in Butler, Gambetti, en Sabsay 2016, p. 25.
19Sturm 2014, p. 65.
20In tegenstelling tot, of in aanvulling op, James Elkins onthullende theorie over hoe handelingen van het zien zowel het geziene object als het ziende subject transformeren (Elkins 1997), beargumenteer ik hier dat het zien van een handicap in de kunst ons zien verandert.
21Siebers in Levin 2010.
22De titel van het kunstwerk had in 2012 niet dezelfde glans als nu in het tijdperk van de Covid-19-pandemie. Het schrijven van dit essay begin 2021 maakt me scherper bewust van de noodzaak van een ‘kritische esthetiek’, een esthetiek die niet alleen de representaties van de belichaamde menselijke realiteit verandert, maar ook van de manier waarop we, door middel van lichamelijke urgenties, de wereld om ons heen waarnemen. Voor meer informatie over adem en kwetsbaarheid, zie Magdalena Gorska's ‘Breathing Matters’ (2016). Zie ook Angelo Custódio's waardevolle artistieke werk over ademhaling als belichaamde dialoog (2021). Custódio's werk is een belangrijke bijdrage aan de disability-esthetiek in performatieve - en geluidskunst doordat “deze het performatieve gebruik van de stem onderzoekt om sonische ontmoetingen met het kwetsbare te ontwikkelen”: foursistersproject.nl/en/calendar/breathing-sites- door-angelo-custodio-yara-said/ .
23Genomen van Marc Quinns website.
24Mieke Bal, ‘The Commitment to Look,’ Journal of Visual Culture 4/2 (2005): p. 153. Nadruk op het origineel.
25Sturm 2014, p. 81.
26Siebers in Levin 2010.

Bibliografie

‘Affordance.’ Merriam Webster. www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/affordance.

Bal, Mieke, ‘The Commitment to Look.’ Journal of Visual Culture 4/2 (2005): pp. 145-62.

Butler, Judith, Precarious Life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence. London/New York: Verso, 2006.

Butler, Judith, Zeynep Gambetti, en Leticia Sabsay, eds. Vulnerability in Resistance. Duke University Press, 2016.

Campbell, Fiona A. Kumari, ‘Inciting Legal Fictions: Disability's Date with Ontology and the Ableist Body of the Law.’ In Griffith Law Review 10, 2001: 42–62.

Custódio, Angelo & Said, Yara, ‘Breathing /sites’. foursistersproject.nl/en/calendar/breathing-sites-by-angelo-custodio-yara-said/

Diamond, Sara, ‘Physics, Perception, Immersion: Introduction.’ In Euphoria and Dystopia: The Banff New Media Institute Dialogues, edited by Sarah Cook and Sara Diamond. Riverside Architectural Press, 2020: pp. 170-198.

Elkins, James, The Object Stares Back: On the Nature of Seeing. Mariner Books: 1997.

Górska, Magdalena, Breathing Matters: Feminist Inter-Sectional Politics of Vulnerability. Linköping Studies in Arts and Science: Linköping University, 2016.

Hall, Melinda C., ‘Critical Disability Theory.’ Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2019 edition). plato.stanford.edu/entries/disability-critical/.

Hiskes, Andries, ‘The Affective Affordances of Disability.’ Digressions: Amsterdam Journal of Critical Theory, Cultural Analysis, and Creative Writing 3.2 (2019): pp. 5-17.

Levin, Mike, ‘The Art of Disability: An Interview with Tobin Siebers.’ In Disability Studies Quarterly, Vol. 30/2 (2010).

Mitchell, W. J. T., ‘Seeing Disability.’ Public Culture 13/3 (2001): pp. 391-97.

Quinn, Marc, ‘Artworks: Breath.’ marcquinn.com/artworks/single/breath.

Shildrick, Margrit. Embodying the Monster: Encounters with the Vulnerable Self. London: Sage, 2002.

Siebers, Tobin, ‘Disability Aesthetics and the Body Beautiful: Signposts in the History of Art.’ ALTER, European Journal of Disability Research No. 2 (2008): pp. 329–336.

Siebers, Tobin, ‘Disability Representation and the political Dimension of Art.’ DESIGNABILITIES. Design Research Journal for Bodies, Things & Interaction (2014).

Sturm, Jules, Bodies We Fail. Productive Embodiments of Imperfection. Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag, 2014.

‘Vulnerable.’ Merriam Webster. www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/vulnerability.

Weiss, Gail, Body Images: Embodiment as Intercorporeality. New York: Routledge, 1999.
events:
share via:
twitter facebook